September 11 Memorial: Remembering the victims who died at the World Trade Center and Pentagon, and in Pennsylvania

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Kim Williams sings a tribute to his brother, Dwayne.
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Maj. Dwayne Williams

Age: 40

Hometown: Jacksonville, Ala., USA

Occupation: U.S. Army, U.S. Army

Location: Ground, Pentagon

"Tammy, Dwayne's wife, sent me a package in the mail. I opened it up, and it had a brief letter explaining it was one of Dwayne's favorite ties. She wanted me to have it. Immediately, my mind said, 'Oh, wow. It's beautiful.' But that's not why it's special. It's special because it's Dwayne's. At first, I wore it at least once a week, like I had a part of him on me. I still wear it regularly, but not as much, to feel closer to him." --Roy Williams, brother

Profile:

Army Maj. Dwayne Williams served his first three years as a paratrooper and Ranger. He planned to remain in the Army even after becoming eligible for retirement in 2003. He served in the Persian Gulf War and in July was posted to the Pentagon.

Williams, 40, has been missing since Flight 77 crashed into the section of the Pentagon where he worked. Last weekend, much of the Williams family gathered in his native Jacksonville, Ala., and tried to make sense of the tragedy.

"He got a nice, good job for his last two years. But who'd believe something like this would happen?" said his brother, Air Force Staff Sgt. Troy Williams, of the Geilenkirchen NATO Air Base in Germany.

As a high school football player, Dwayne Williams won a full scholarship to the University of North Alabama, in Florence. He has another brother in military service: Army Staff Sgt. 1st Class Kim Williams. A fourth brother, Roy Williams, is a business reporter for the Birmingham News.

Williams is survived by his wife, Tammy; son, Tyler, 17; and daughter, Kelsie, 13.

"We have faith," Troy Williams said from his mother's home yesterday. "We're all Christians and know he's in a better place. We'll see him again."

<style> #PentmemMemoryWrap { margin-left: 95px; width: 506px; background: #faf7ec; font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 11px; color: #2e2e2e; } #PentmemMemoryTop { padding: 14px; } #PentmemMemoryTop img { padding: 0px 0px 0px 10px; } #PentmemMemoryTop .headline { font-size: 12px; font-weight: bold; } #memAuthor { float: right; margin: 2px 20px 20px 0px; font-weight: bold; } .blurb { font-size: 11px; line-height: 16px; margin-left: -92px} </style> <div id="PentmemMemoryWrap"> <div id="PentmemMemoryTop"> <div class="blurb"><p><!-- <img src="http://media.washingtonpost.com/wp-srv/nation/interactives/pentagonmemorial/images/1507.jpg" align="right" border="0"> -->"At a memorial service held in Washington, D.C., Brig. Gen. Mike Rochelle recalled Army Maj. Dwayne Williams' most famous trait - his ever-present smile.</p> <p>Rochelle saw Dwayne shortly after the major reported to the Pentagon in July 2001. While walking down a hallway, a booming voice interrupted him.</p> <p>"Hey!" He looked back and saw a cheerful, smiling Dwayne.</p> <p>He spoke of Dwayne's sweet golden spirit.</p> <p>"Those eyes aglow and his magnificent smile are what caused men in the desert (Persian Gulf War), facing uncertain outcome, to follow him and respect him," Rochelle said.</p> <p>- From "911 God Help Us" by Roy Williams.</p> <p>Words to the song "My Brother," penned by Kim Williams of Sierra Vista, Ariz. in tribute to his slain brother, Army Maj. Dwayne Williams</p> <p>"My Brother" by Kim Williams</p> <p>There was a time when we used to be,<br> One of a kind brother you and me<br> Running round the house playing games<br> Just little children, calling Momma’s Name<br> As we grew older we would dream about<br> Things we would do all four without a doubt<br> Our little brothers they’re our family<br> Without Mom and Dad<br> Tell me where would we be?</p> <p>(Chorus)</p> <p>My brother<br> since you came into my life<br> You taught me wrong from right<br> Everything you do, I knew that it was right for you.</p> <p>My brother<br> You made a legacy of love for all to see<br> Your smile, your ways<br> You’re always in my thoughts<br> And in my heart, you’re here to stay<br> You are my brother<br> There like no other<br> We’ll always miss you.</p> <p>Whenever I think of you<br> There’s nothing you would not do<br> You were there to help me through my hardest days<br> Nothing could bring you down<br> You told me you’d always be around.<br> We’d share all our dreams</p> <p>You gave your wife so much joy<br> A beautiful girl and a big strong boy<br> She carried you through the storm<br> You were the captain of the ship to keep them safe and warm</p> <p>(Bridge)</p> <p>So I promise to let the world know<br> You’re my brother and I cannot let you go<br> You live because our God loves you<br> I promise to always be right here for you</p> <p>(Chorus)</p> <p>My brother<br> since you came into my life<br> You taught me wrong from right<br> Everything you do, I knew that it was right for you.</p> <p>My brother<br> You made a legacy of love for all to see<br> Your smile, your ways<br> You’re always in my thoughts<br> And in my heart, you’re here to stay<br> You are my brother<br> There like no other<br> We’ll always miss you."</p> <div id="memAuthor"> <!-- /end memAuthor --></div> <!-- /end blurb --></div> <br> </div> </div>

Source: The Washington Post, AP and washingtonpost.com

The profiles in this feature were written in the months following Sept. 11, 2001.

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Timeline

A day after the 9/11 attacks a makeshift memorial was created on the Arlington Memorial Cemetery fence. Seven years later, the first 9/11 memorial is opening.

Related Coverage:

3-Dimensional Virtual Memorial

Victims Remembered in Maryland

One Family's Loss

Stepping Through the Ashes

Pentagon Under Attack

Five Year Anniversary Coverage


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