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September 11 Memorial: Remembering the victims who died at the World Trade Center and Pentagon, and in Pennsylvania

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Marjorie C. Salamone

Age: 53

Hometown: Springfield, Va., USA

Occupation: Budget program analyst, U.S. Army

Location: Ground, Pentagon

Profile:

At age 8, Marjorie Champion started driving the hay truck for her father in Pine Mountain, Ga. At 16, she headed off to college, where she taught her roommate statistics and fell in love with Ben Salamone, her future husband. At 53, just two weeks ago, Marjorie helped their daughter Amanda move out on her own to New York.

Tuesday morning, Amanda, 22, called her mother's Pentagon office. Through her Manhattan window, Amanda saw the attack on the World Trade Center towers. Salamone comforted her, then left a message on her husband's voice mail: Amanda is safe.

"She was always thinking of us," said Ben Salamone, 55, who at the time was giving a briefing at the Department of Agriculture. After 31 years of marriage, that was the last time he heard Marjorie's voice. "She was judged quickly. Now, she's in heaven with the Lord," he said.

Marjorie Salamone would often carpool with other Springfield residents headed to the Pentagon, where she was an Army budget analyst. Her husband recalled, "A neighbor came by and said, 'Your wife was a wonderful slug,' " using the jargon for carpooling commuters.

Salamone was also a take-charge person. When a neighbor's basement flooded, she tracked down the water main and cranked off the flow. After a big freeze, she went door to door helping neighbors relight pilot lights. She was set to help her dad harvest the family's 120 pecan trees.

When her mother wanted a new carpet, Marjorie navigated a dump truck to the mill store to pick it up. Somebody hit the wrong lever, nearly dumping their load on the road home.

"We sat there, and we laughed," recalled Salamone's mother, Lillian Champion, 78. Then they finished the job. "We took everything out of the living room and stretched it out," she said.

Friends of Amanda and Ann Marie, 24, Salamone's older daughter, said she always looked out for them, too.

"I needed a comforter. She went and bought one for me," said Maire Soosaar, 23, whose own mother had passed away.

"She told Amanda she wanted to do everything she could for me," Soosaar said, "because nobody shouldn't have a mom."

-- Michael Laris

<style> #PentmemMemoryWrap { margin-left: 95px; width: 506px; background: #faf7ec; font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 11px; color: #2e2e2e; } #PentmemMemoryTop { padding: 14px; } #PentmemMemoryTop img { padding: 0px 0px 0px 10px; } #PentmemMemoryTop .headline { font-size: 12px; font-weight: bold; } #memAuthor { float: right; margin: 2px 20px 20px 0px; font-weight: bold; } .blurb { font-size: 11px; line-height: 16px; margin-left: -92px} </style> <div id="PentmemMemoryWrap"> <div id="PentmemMemoryTop"> <div class="blurb"><p><img src="http://media.washingtonpost.com/wp-srv/nation/interactives/pentagonmemorial/images/1679.jpg" align="right" border="0">"Growing up, our mom allowed us to eat whatever we wanted, yet was brilliant at getting us to choose healthy foods. We always had dinner as a family, but instead of an adult meal of meat and potatoes, we were served "odds and ends" -- pieces of cut up fruit, vegetables, meat, and cheese. And if we wanted a snack, mom always had a frozen bag of corn in the freezer to nibble on straight from the bag. For many years, we even thought frozen sweet corn was candy. </p> <p>To this day, now that we are in our late 20s and early 30s, we both still keep a bag of frozen corn in the freezer, just for a snack."</p> <div id="memAuthor">-- Amanda Salamone and Ann Marie Salamone Santillo, daughters <!-- /end memAuthor --></div> <!-- /end blurb --></div> <br> </div> </div>

Source: The Washington Post, AP and washingtonpost.com

The profiles in this feature were written in the months following Sept. 11, 2001.

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A day after the 9/11 attacks a makeshift memorial was created on the Arlington Memorial Cemetery fence. Seven years later, the first 9/11 memorial is opening.

Related Coverage:

3-Dimensional Virtual Memorial

Victims Remembered in Maryland

One Family's Loss

Stepping Through the Ashes

Pentagon Under Attack

Five Year Anniversary Coverage


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